Earth Day 2014: I spent the entire day working on a paper on climate change and bark beetles. An hour ago I realized I had ‘missed’ Earth Day. I hadn’t done anything to support taking care of my planet. Then I realized, maybe I had.

Earth Day 2014: I spent the entire day working on a paper on climate change and bark beetles. An hour ago I realized I had ‘missed’ Earth Day. I hadn’t done anything to support taking care of my planet. Then I realized, maybe I had.

For Earth Day. A global selfie!!!

Check out this link and join folks around the world on earth Day! I’ve never taken a selfie. Now I have a good reason!http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/globalselfie/

Years of Living Dangerously Premiere Full Episode

You can see this one ‘ahead’ and without SHOWTIME subscription. Pretty great episode!

Years of Living Dangerously: Behind the Scenes

You’ll even see Ryan and I in the lab looking at mountain pine beetle fungi in this short!

Want to see how climate change affects bark beetles and fire? On April 13th, Showtime will begin airing its new series “The Years of Living Dangerously.” Their crew spent three days in Montana filming mountain pine beetle impacts and included our work in the lab and field on the insect. On another trip, they shot footage of hot shots dealing with a wildfire. ‘Years’ has assembled an impressive group of scientists to oversee the science of the series, including Michael Mann. The film crew was an absolute joy to work with. The trailers look amazing! I am really looking forward to viewing the episodes!

Want to see how climate change affects bark beetles and fire? On April 13th, Showtime will begin airing its new series “The Years of Living Dangerously.” Their crew spent three days in Montana filming mountain pine beetle impacts and included our work in the lab and field on the insect. On another trip, they shot footage of hot shots dealing with a wildfire. ‘Years’ has assembled an impressive group of scientists to oversee the science of the series, including Michael Mann. The film crew was an absolute joy to work with. The trailers look amazing! I am really looking forward to viewing the episodes!

Logging no panacea for pine beetle outbreaks

Some coverage of my new paper by environmental reporter Bob Berwyn.

The BIG beetle question right now - Did THIS cold snap kill off a lot of mountain pine beetles in Montana?
In previous blog posts I covered how the beetle’s larvae ‘cold harden’ to survive winter and why the early cold snap this winter likely didn’t kill very many beetles.  But, what happened this time?
Beetle larvae survive winter because they make antifreeze. Producing antifreeze is energetically expensive so larvae regulate its production. If temperatures remain cold, the beetles continue to maintain high levels. But if things warm up, levels of the antifreeze begin to slowly drop. And that means they can be vulnerable at warmer temperatures.
This cold snap may be different in its effects on the beetles than the previous one. Why? It got much colder and for a longer period. But, more importantly, it was preceded by a lengthy warm period in January with temperatures in many locations in Montana reaching as high as 50F. This long warm period may have allowed drop in antifreeze concentrations and a subsequent increase in susceptibility to cold.
So, has it killed a lot of beetles? I am going take a look tomorrow in the Phillipsburg and Georgetown Lake area.  I’ll post what I find.

The BIG beetle question right now - Did THIS cold snap kill off a lot of mountain pine beetles in Montana?

In previous blog posts I covered how the beetle’s larvae ‘cold harden’ to survive winter and why the early cold snap this winter likely didn’t kill very many beetles.  But, what happened this time?

Beetle larvae survive winter because they make antifreeze. Producing antifreeze is energetically expensive so larvae regulate its production. If temperatures remain cold, the beetles continue to maintain high levels. But if things warm up, levels of the antifreeze begin to slowly drop. And that means they can be vulnerable at warmer temperatures.

This cold snap may be different in its effects on the beetles than the previous one. Why? It got much colder and for a longer period. But, more importantly, it was preceded by a lengthy warm period in January with temperatures in many locations in Montana reaching as high as 50F. This long warm period may have allowed drop in antifreeze concentrations and a subsequent increase in susceptibility to cold.

So, has it killed a lot of beetles? I am going take a look tomorrow in the Phillipsburg and Georgetown Lake area.  I’ll post what I find.

More than 200 moose to be radio-collared in major B.C. study

So what caused the decline? The beetle outbreak OR increased roads and salvage effects? It will be interesting to see what this study turns up.

Why emails must be well-written and error-free

A great post on why it is important to communicate well when emailing. At least half of the emails I receive from prospective graduate students are poorly written with misspellings and poor punctuation. Many times the content is hard to follow. Dead in the water.